Legal News

 

 

Legal Highlights (5 September 2017 – 8 September 2017)   

SC: Fintech collaborations with HK, Dubai, and Singapore The Securities Commission Malaysia has signed financial technology cooperation agreements, known as fintech bridges, with the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission, the Dubai Financial Services Authority, and the Monetary Authority of Singapore, in order to regulate innovations in the digital finance industry. The fintech bridges also aims to facilitate the operation of innovative businesses in each other’s jurisdictions and to enable the exploration of potential joint innovation projects.
(Source: THE STAR) 

Australia: New anti-vilification law passed New anti-vilification legislation (“the Law”) has been approved by the Australian Parliament to prevent hate speech during a national debate on legalising same-sex marriage. The Law provides multiple safeguards against anyone being subjected to threats, intimidation or vilification during the debate. A breach of such Law would result in a fine of up to AUD12,600.
(Source: BBC) 

EU: Google appeals against huge EU anti-trust fine Tech giant, Google has appealed against the fine of EUR2.4 Billion imposed by the European Competition Commission (“the Commission”). The Commission has ruled that Google has committed an abuse of power by positioning its own shopping comparison service at the top of the Google search results.
(Source: BBC) 

US: Photographer wins legal fight in 'Monkey selfie A court in San Francisco has dismissed the appeal filed by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta) on behalf of a macaque monkey, Naruto and ruled in favour of the photographer, Slater, in the copyright dispute of the “monkey selfie”.
(Source: BBC) 

US: Chatbot offers legal service to Equifax data breach victims Chatbot, an artificial intelligent chatbot that provides free legal advice has been configured in order to assist victims of data breach in suing the credit reporting giant, Equifax, by generating court documents for small claims court to the victims without a lawyer.
(Source: BBC)