Legal News

 

 

Legal Highlights (8 January 2018 – 12 January 2018)   

 

FC: Intention must be proven in sedition case The Federal Court in Mat Suhaimi bin Shafiei v Kerajaan Malaysia, has quashed a Court of Appeal ruling that intention must be proven in every sedition case. This would mean that Section 3(3) of the Sedition Act 1948 is valid again, where conviction is warranted once it is proven that seditious statements were made by the accused.
(Source: THE STAR)

SC: ICO banned Securities Commission Malaysia (SC) has issued a direction for an initial coin offering (ICO) in Malaysia to cease its launch and other related activities. The direction is due to the likelihood that the disclosures and representations in the white paper of the ICO would contravene the securities laws. In an ICO, white papers stipulating the business plans for raising funds via the issuance of cryptocurrencies will be produced by the parties. 
(Source: THE STAR)

Singapore: Accelerate! to be launched
Accelerate!, a 100-day accelerator programme that aims to groom legaltech startups and to incubate new business models or services conceived by law firms, will be launched in April 2018. It is also part of the Future Law Innovation Programme (Flip), an initiative to prepare the legal industry for technological disruption.

(Source: SINGAPORE LAW WATCH)

Singapore: Laws passed to clarify jurisdiction of Singapore International Commercial Court The Singapore International Commercial Court (SICC) can now hear any proceedings relating to international commercial arbitration as the High Court under the International Arbitration Act, following the passage of the Supreme Court of Judicature (Amendment) Bill on 9 January 2018. This would increase Singapore’s attractiveness as a seat of arbitration, given that SICC includes international judges who hear disputes governed by foreign law.
(Source: SINGAPORE LAW WATCH)

Singapore: Lex Quanta develops simulator predicting division of matrimonial assets in divorce cases
Lex Quanta, founded by four law students, has developed a simulator which predicts division of matrimonial property by computing factors through an algorithm. The maker aims to extend the capabilities of the stimulator to other classes such as personal injuries relating to traffic accidents and commercial cases involving contract and intellectual property disputes.
(Source: SINGAPORE LAW WATCH)